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Flavour Anomalies with advanced particle Identification MEthods

The project is about studying phenomena observed in particle physics
that we do not (yet) understand, and that could have a very important
impact on our understanding of the way the Universe has developed. We
will investigate how one sort of elementary particles (leptons)
interacts with the other (quarks) by using the data that we will
collect with the Belle II detector at an electron-positron collider in
Tsukuba, Japan. Within the research project, novel, highly advanced
identification methods for charged particles will be developed, of
crucial importance in separating the interesting very rare processes
from the much more abundant reactions.

ABOUT THE PROJECT

What FAIME is all about

The Standard Model of particle physics, formulated nearly half a century ago, describes the fundamental matter particles and their interactions – almost. There are some acknowledged gaps in its description of our universe as well as new theories and experiments that point to potential violations of some of its existing ‘laws’. Lepton universality refers to a key assumption underlying the Standard Model, which states that all three of the equally charged leptons (three of the 12 matter particles, with different masses) are believed to interact in the same way with other particles. Thus, they should be created equally in particle transformations or ‘decays’ when differences in their masses are considered. However, growing evidence suggests that this may not be the case. The EU-funded ERC Advanced Grant project FAIME plans to provide a definite demonstration with experiments involving rare decays, exploiting highly sensitive detection technology and sophisticated analyses. We will investigate how one sort of elementary particles (leptons) interacts with the other (quarks) by using the data that the Belle II Collaboration will collect with the Belle II detector at the SuperKEKB electron-positron collider in Tsukuba, Japan.

Within the research programme, novel, highly advanced identification methods for charged particles are being developed. They will be of crucial importance to suppress backgrounds arising from other, much more abundant decays in measurements of rare processes where the sensitivity to a possible contribution of New Physics is largest.

This ERC-Advanced-Grant-supported project is being carried out at the Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) and Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana. JSI is by far the largest research institute in Slovenia, covering a broad range of disciplines, from physics, chemistry and biochemistry to electronics and computing. Its Department for experimental particle physics (F9) has strong involvements in the ATLAS experiment at CERN, Belle and Belle II experiments at KEK in Tsukuba, Japan, and the Pierre Auger Project at FERMILAB in the USA.

OUR NEWS CORNER

Latest News

Follow the progress of the project and discover science bits to dive in the world of particle physics.

Early stage researcher position open for work at Belle II

We are looking for candidates to join our research efforts in the framework of the FAIME ERC Advance…

Belle II Physics Meeting

Rome, Nov. 19 – Dec. 3 2021 European members of the Belle II Collaboration met for an in-perso…